Original Beauty (Mama Africa in Growing World)

About

Now a 21 year old college student who started this blog because I am a Pan-Africanist at heart. This blog focuses on my interest in African and Pan-African topics. It is what I come across daily, what I learn in African and African American Studies and most importantly information I would like to share with whoever stumbles across this blog. I am Nigerian/Cameroonian by ethnicity and American by nationality. Following my heart and leaving my footprints in the sand one step at a time. <3

cutfromadiffcloth:

Brand: Kwesy

DesignerKwesi Amponsah

cutfromadiffcloth.tumblr.com

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blackfashion:

MERCEDES-BENZ FASHION WEEK JOBURG 2014 

Photography: Uyapo Ketogetswe / www.uyapoport.tumblr.com

Designer: AUGUSTINE

Location: Johannesburg, South Africa

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shopcoletteclayton:

Muhammad Ali on a tour of Lagos, Nigeria on June 2, 1964.

fenwayhealth:

If you think you’ve been exposed to HIV, Post-Exposure Prophylaxis (PEP) may help prevent the spread of HIV up to 72 hours after exposure.

Learn more and get people talking at PEP at TalkPEP.org.

Learn more about the campaign

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softdoublechin:

tinyameena:

<3

Rofl me and the bae!! $$

yagazieemezi:

1953: How I Wear My Crown

Often recognized for her face alone, Folasade Titilayo Adeso is not just a model or any photographer’s muse; she is also an artist whose creative vision transcends various mediums. Born in Abeokuta, Nigeria, raised in Canada, Folasade is currently based in New York City; the ideal place to fuel passion and dreams. A talented graphic designer, she recently embarked on a journey to build a legacy for her father who passed away in 2012.

Y: What inspired 1953?

Folasade: My father passed away in 2012 and coming from a family of all girls, it hit me that we would not be able to pass on my father’s name the way men can. When I went home in 2013 I was continuously greeted by family and friends who would say, “Welcome to your father’s land” and that stuck with me. 1953 is the year my father was born and the year that Nigeria became my father’s land.

Y: Tell us more about the head-wraps.

Folasade: Growing up, I would watch my mother tie her head-wraps so intricately on a daily basis. At the age of 22 I started learning to tie my own head-wraps by watching her. Being so far away from Nigeria, wearing head-wraps allow me to feel more connected to home.  It makes me feel so regal and proud not to mention that they are a colorful addition to whatever outfit I may have on! While walking though the market-place with my aunt in Nigeria, I was overwhelmed by the array of bright fabric splayed out in front of me in the stalls. I then realized that I could share how head-wraps made me feel with other women. It’s not just a piece of fabric. It’s a piece of my home. It’s me walking though the market place thinking of the women, my customers and what they would like. My mother has handed down to me some of her own wraps and I know just how long their can last. My wraps are for women to keep and treasure for years to come.

Keep reading + more pictures

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Dedicated to the Cultural Preservation of the African Aesthetic

atane:

Some faces from the Nigeria Global Day of Action protest in support of the Nigerian LGBTQ community.

Click here for more pictures.

lesliehatchard:

geekerrific:

cyberteeth:

Chimamamda Ngozi Adiche, We Should All Be Feminists

The most powerful thing anyone has ever said to me: “You deserve to take up space.” 

👏

dynamicafrica:

Wizkid’s new music video, On Top Your Matter.